Skip to main content

Curiosities.

 An amusing memory from my distant past...


                It was a daily routine of the neighbourhood aunties.  Evenings would invariably find the trio planted onto a favourite bench in the park; packets of bhelpuri or sevpuri open in their laps and risque jokes spewing from their painted mouths.  With one eye on us kids,  as we played nearby, and the other eye on the young couples, who hid behind the trees, cooing sweet nothings to each other, these aunties went about their business of gossiping about all and sundry, arousing curiosity in those around. The mischievous looks they gave each other on spotting the lovebirds spoke volumes about what transpired in those grown-up minds.
              And, our ever inquisitive juvenile minds would often try to make sense of the tidbits that wafted past us; but, whom would we ask what those meant? From their sniggers and guffaws, we kids did  know their talks consisted of  the 'unmentionable' stuff, not meant for our innocent minds.  For, each time we tried inching closer to them, they would shush each other up and glare at us for trying to eavesdrop.
               A loud crack of  laughter from their corner and we little ones  suppressed shy giggles. How that memory brings a smile to my face now!
         
           I find it amusing, and a tad ridiculous, at all that intrigue from back then.  But, that's how young minds are - ever so inquisitive, curious to know what goes on in the adult world, in  the adult talks.  Especially curious about what they  are not entitled to learn about at their tender age.

          Do you remember those times from your childhood, when you would paste your ears to the walls, trying to catch snippets of  discussions that went on between the elders in the adjacent room,  and then dissecting them to make sense of it all?



*The above post has been written for Wordy Wednesday.
This week's prompt: Word prompt: RISQUE.
This week's prompt comes from  B-A-R member, writer and blogger, Geetika Gupta


       

Comments

  1. Can't believe we are at that age when we can do the same to our kids:)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. :-) Yes, Priya! We can be those mean aunties now!

      Delete
  2. I enjoyed reading about your memories of childhood wanting to understand the adult world through the "aunties". I find it so cute how in India they call women aunties like that. Fun memories. I guess most of my childhood memories of adults would be the parties my parents had when we lived on bases. The military can be quite coarse and I remember lots of people drinking and joking around with lots of raunchy, sexist and risque humour.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I can very well imagine the scenes at the parties, Cat! :D

      Delete
  3. Shilpa, I remember how we used to try and listen in to my mother and her friends' talks and would guess what they meant by the words we overheard them discussing and laughing like schoolgirls :) Loved your post, happy writing.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Gosh. I'm the one in my friend group who has this habit of cracking "double-meaning" jokes. And the only retort I have when they giggle and tell me to stop cracking these jokes is - If you're so innocent, how did you even understand the joke? :D
    And I really wonder sometimes, how did we even figure out that the things which the elders talk about are things which we were not supposed to know about? The hushed voices are to be blamed for increasing the curiosities in our young minds! :P

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hahaha, Mithila! I can imagine, you sitting in the centre of the circle of your friends, cracking all 'those' kinda jokes and having a rocking time! :))
      True, that. I, too, wonder, how we knew that those were 'those' kind of talks!

      Delete
  5. This one took me down the memory lane, Shilpa. :)

    ReplyDelete

Post a Comment

Popular posts from this blog

A pleasant surprise.

Life does that. Springs surprises when you are least expecting any. And  you are left baffled, overwhelmed, ecstatic, and, surprised, too! You find it unbelievable that such a thing could happen with you. And, it takes a lot of probing and analysing to finally accept that something this unimaginable could happen to you, too!

              The above emotions are  what I went through when I received a message from the Manager of Baggout that my blog had been selected as one of the 15 best love and relationships blogs in India. I must have read the message 5 times and still found it unbelievable. In fact, I thought someone was playing a prank. I made enquiries, tried finding out all about Baggout and went back to where I was - in a state of utter disbelief! Call it low self esteem if you wish, but I wondered how  anyone could find my one and a half year old blog worthy of any such mention.

        The feeling was  good, nay, great. But, unless I saw it all in black and w…

The Pakistani Bride - Book Review.

I had been on quite a long reading hiatus, which, fortunately, ended last week. I bought not one, but three books of varied genres to begin afresh. I wrote about Love stories, an anthology edited by Ruskin Bond, and,  I let you go', by Clare Mackintosh. In today's post, I review the third book, 'The Pakistani Bride', by the internationally acclaimed  author, Bapsi Sidhwa.

   Her books have been translated and published in several languages and she has received many an honour for her literary works. As humbled as I feel reviewing her book, I hope I am able to do justice to her work. So, help me God.


The Pakistani Bride  is the story of Zaitoon, a little girl orphaned during the exodus that was the Partition of India and Pakistan. The bloodbath that led to a complete annihilation of the fabric of our country left countless families shattered and destructed.

 The following two lines  paint an accurate picture of  the aftermath of the Partition, of people's struggl…

The Wise Man Said - Book Review.

Book: The Wise Man Said.

Author: Priya Kumar.

Genre: Motivational.



The story in a nutshell: Sammy, an 80 year old billionaire, realises that the secret behind his success in life has been the various sacrifices he made along the way. One of the foremost being his neglect towards his family that rendered him a lonely soul bereft of a single person cheering him for his win in the race called 'life'. This realisation spurs him to leave behind his identity and money and participate in the life he missed out on. Eleven months in a year, he takes on a new identity and sets out to experience anything - even death - to participate in adventures across the world. All he carries with him are his curiosity and his willingness to experience anything that life may present him with.

The Wise Man Said is a collection of twelve stories from Sammy's adventures that he penned down in his diary; experiences from his exciting journey that left him feeling enriched and contented at a life well liv…