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The lucky ones.

 Mira stood staring at the showcase which was stacked with baby socks and shoes in every pastel hue. There were dainty socks in  baby pink and powder blue and lemon yellow and virgin white. All sprinkled with a generous amount of polka dots and teddy bears and puppy pictures all over them. Some also had a delicate lace at the top, and some, satin ribbons. The tiny shoes too came in a wide  range of designs and colours. Blue, white, red, pink, yellow,  with  pictures of baby animals, stars and odd shapes and cartoon figures.
      She gazed at it, hypnotised by  all the rich stuff in front of her. She felt she could spend her entire life in this shoe shop! How lucky these  kids were! All the fancy stuff they could have for themselves as soon as they stepped into this world! It made her envious of the lives they lived, the comfort and the luxury they were blessed with. Oh, what she would give to be born  to families that could afford the best of the best for their children!

    "MIRA, THERE YOU ARE! How many times have I  instructed you not let Rahul baba out of sight in the mall! You know how he wanders off on his own, don't you? Oh god, where is my baby gone?  If something happens to him, Mira, I am not going to pay you a single paisa, do you get that, you idiot girl! ? Now, GO, look for him!"

    Mira sighed and  started walking towards the toy section in search of her employer's little boy; her mind still lost in all the fancy footwear she had gaped at. How she wished she could swap places with these lucky kids.


 *I am participating in the Bar-a-thon at Blog-a-rhythm, for an exciting 7 days of blogging and blog-hopping. Do join us with your posts and have a thrilling week! 

*Today's prompt: Tiny Shoes.  

*Member of Team Orange Tango.






     

Comments

  1. Loved reading this piece. Plight of many children in our country, tiny bare feet

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  2. Loved the POV chosen. You did well with this prompt. :)

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  3. Your post makes me want to give Mira enough shoes to last a lifetime :)

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  4. Sigh. Poor Mira. I love how you worked in the theme of excesses here. So unfair is life.

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  5. Agree with SHanaya. Love the change of point of view and the twist it gave to the tale.

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  6. Tiny Shoes,yes. But the hearts of the ones buying them are even tinier!

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  7. Touching story.
    Yes, it's the dream of some less-privileged kids to swap places with the lucky pampered kids whose parents can afford such shoes.

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  8. Life is sometimes so unfair isn't it! Beautifully expression of longing and the impatience of the the employer.

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  9. So unfair life is. I wish I could help even one person like her. sigh!

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    Replies
    1. Yes, Nabanita. If we all could pitch in, life would be a bit bearable for those poor souls.

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  10. I'm sure kids whose parents can afford those shoes don't appreciate them half as much.

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    Replies
    1. Yes, Tulika. It all gets taken for granted.

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  11. Life, certainly does not treat everyone equally...

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  12. life sure is unfair at times. A touching tale.. wish Mira gets all the shoes in the world

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    Replies
    1. Oh, I wish all the Miras get some shoes and all the things they long for!

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  13. The haves n the haave-nots, so unfair, but thats how life is. Post with a hige heart Shilpa. Hugs.

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    Replies
    1. Life is unfair, Sunila!
      Hugs to you, too!

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  14. Agree with Roshan and Shanaya :) Well written :)

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  15. Made me feel so sad. The difference between haves and have nots and no one gives any thought.

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  16. Loved this take Shilpa. its a bit sad too.

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    Replies
    1. Thank you, Ls. Yes, it was sad, but that 's life!

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